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's organized this nonthreatening environment of pluralism, pluralism and that is manipulable, patronized in any sense controlled. but it's actually ultimately useless. and the result, the fundamental reason why algeria is a producing interesting political change, there's all the reason should know about, the fact that any sense it had its arab spring 20 years ago, algerians have a point when the same we been through this movie. we were way ahead of everybody. that's all perfectly true, but the fundamental reason of what is yes, people do not know what to do. of the regime and the opposition have reached the limits of their repertoire. and the western discourse on political change in this region are not suggesting anything useful to them at all. let me leave it there. >> fantastic, thank you very much. hugh as i was been one f the most astute analysts, a very difficult place i know, and he's just a marvelous job of describing the emergence of algeria's own version of liberalized hypocrisy. and, of course, i think he described what i consider liberalized autocracy ultimately to be, and that is tr
? quayle: i had a very strong record on the environment and the united states senate. [laughter] i have a record where i voted for the legislation. i have a record where i voted against my president of the override of the clean water act. i voted for the major pieces of environmental legislation that has come down and voted on in the united states senate. this administration i support this administration and its environmental effort is moved in the area of the first time to deal with the ozone problem. we now have an international plan to become a treaty that is commonly referred to as the montreal treaty. for the first time we are talking about the impact of the progress of the environment. we are committed to the impairment to take the children hiking and fishing, walking in the woods we have the commitment to reserving in the environment, to bring up the environment we can't help but think about the environmental policy of the governor of massachusetts. he talked about being an environmentalist. let me tell you about his environmental policy. the boston harbor, the boston harbor whic
that they foster or can deal in a diverse environment. that's understood the plan, that it's not just giving you a plus because of race. it is combining that with other factors. >> there is a plus because of race. many factors in the decision. might i say that the white student president of the class in a different school is a measure of leadership. leadership is an independent factor in the pai. he's not getting a point because of his race. he's getting that because of his leadership. but his recent tour criteria to argue for anyone. it is an independent add-on, something they can use to boost a pai score or element in any way they like as they contextualize it. is that it's not necessarily, not narrowly tailored. it ignores alternatives and gives disparate treatment to asian-americans because they are minorities as well enter the extent it depends on the classroom factor, there's simply no way to relate or fit what they are doing to the solution of the problem, which they use as a major foundation of their proposal, which is the nonfirst first classroom. certainly dishes no correspondence ther
you could even say we're a little bit ambitious. right. you come in to the environment, many people came in without a job. they were volunteers and want to get a job. some people -- they want to get noticed by the right people. and they, you know, and you have people who have been hired who want maybe more responsibility. right than they probably traditional in their job. and the department heads who are racing against each other maybe to get a little more budget than the other and get a little more turf than the others and you might expect. you have the thing going on it's a chaotic time. you need to get control of this. because, you know, in this environment, where there no sort of norms, it's like building -- it is like building a village from scratch. everybody comes to a place with no rules or enormous, no structures, right, it's like the wild west. and not everybody, you know, some people who, you know, have their own tactics for getting their own way. right. sometimes even good people lose control of the inner jerks. it's a problem early in the campaign. we all have them. com
in the environment changes. fetters we think evolve for originally for thermal regulation to keep their owners warm. some creatures that evolve these fetters decided to adopt a new life sign of flying and the ones with the others were better at it than of the ones that didn't have fenders and at that point of aleutians starts to sculpt feathers to make a more aerodynamic. we can see this in modern birds with perfectly symmetrical fedders so they are still just keeping them warm and flying birds have a symmetrical feathers which give them better aerodynamics. kind of shaping it affect after the change. the idea is a trait designed for one thing gets adapted to something else. in technology, in the history of the creative arts in any field where people are trying to be inventive and imaginative the practice of taking an idea from one place and moving it over and applying it in a new context is incredibly powerful. there's a great story knocked in "where good ideas come from: the natural history of innovation," it came to me afterwards, from apple, the most innovative company in the world right now, w
're the best environment for the talent spent before we go to questions, jay, then i want to talk about campaign financing. >> so you're looking at california right now, and that massive increase in the cost of gasoline, when matt said, when consumers are paying for gasoline they are not able to purchase their basic commodities every day. so what's happening? governor brown is proposing a relaxation of regulations that impact the energy industry. that is clearly a concession that regulation drives the cost of energy. we've got to have that same focus and discussion here in washington. because what's happening in california can happen all across this country. >> hawaii, i heard -- >> when we do the big deal everybody thinks we have to do entitlements and defends on one side and taxes on the other. if you have a school pashtuns do with two legs he usually falls over. if we look at what the canadians did with their cash cow, we have more cash cow in energy than any of them. and we can do spending. we can do taxes, and we can to energy which is our cash cow if we go to and you can make a re
many signs. the austrian accord, big supporters of the environment. think about the amount of paper that was wasted when we drafted the oslo accord. thousands of papers. but today we come and we speak with the palestinian leadership about the oslo accord, well, it is written, so what? for example, [inaudible] a holy site for jews in an in accordance to the oslo accord were supposed to go there whenever we want pray, that we cannot go there. it's not safe for jews, cannot go to date and pray at the tomb of jordan. so it is written in the oslo accords. i don't want to another accord and another ceremony at the white house. i don't believe in it. i want to get to the point where there will be real peace with real partner, and still we'll get to that point we will have to manage the conflict. i want to sum up and tell you that the book is very straight. i didn't hide, and some of my colleagues in the parliament told me, you're making a mistake because if you buy something out in the book and you are young relatively, what will happen in two years? people will go back and tell you, your
about monetary policy and current environment and focus primarily the role of large-scale asset purchases. before doing so let me note the usual disclaim, the thoughts are about to give you are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of others on the fomc. there is a considerable diversity of views within the fomc and within, among economists more generally about the use of large-scale asset purchases, lsaps and other unconventional policy tools. this healthy given unenviable circumstances we find ourselves. let me be clear where i stand. i support the committees decision of last month, namely to initiate purchases of mortgage-backed securities, mbs, at a rate of $40 billion a month in tandem with the ongoing maturity extension program of treasury securities. and to plant a con to continue those purchases if the committee does not observe a substantial improvement in the labor market outlook. given where we are and given what we know i firmly believe this was the right decision. in my comments today, i'm only going to briefly review the kise for taking that action as tha
environment, highest valued use is typically measured by who is the highest bidder at the auction. but one of the artificial limits that i was mentioning was setting a limit in particular markets, especially where certain providers can't hold more than x amount. and if that amount that we limit, where we set the limit is not based on, you know, particular facts identifying competitive realities in the marketplace, our -- that view could unintendedly, you know, limit how robust the spectrum auction could be. >> host: now, commissioner pai, one of the concerns from the broadcasters is, first of all, they don't have extra spectrum is one of their thoughts, and also the spectrum that they gave up earlier has not been put into use. are those fair concerns? >> guest: well, i think it is important for us to take into account those concerns, and one of the four principles that i outlined in my statement when we approved the order last friday is that whatever action the commission takes, it as to be fair to all stakeholders. and one of the principal stakeholrs in this context are the television bro
's an understatement. but you go up and in environment, at least i was fortunately enough to where we believe that it was perfectible. you know, it's very, i think, pretty much acceptable or maybe somewhat today to be critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there were obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but it was always this unrelying -- underlying bailiff belief we were entitled -- it was the way we grew up. the nones who were immigrants who would explain it to us we were entitled as citizens of the country to be full participates. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal. it said so in the decoration of independents. there were times later on -- make remarks reciting the not so pleasant remarks and reciting the pledge of allee again or say things i think were -- not be cell phones. [laughter] people can youtube and you it's around forever. i was upset about thing. but i grew up in an environment with people around me who believed that this country could be
nights before the age of 7 at which time i was adopted and raised in an abusive environment, beaten by a step that. if i gave you all that, and told you i would one day accomplish all the things i had accomplished you would say how? some people can say it is because you had a lot of determination. maybe because you had a big heart or a lot of drive. you could have all those things and still never accomplish what i have accomplished without one thing -- the reason i was able to accomplish that is i had the blessing of being born into the greatest country in the world. you can all applaud on that. greatest country in the world where no matter where you are born or how poor you are or where you come from or to your mom or dad was, you are still able to achieve what you achieve. the reason that is is because of the people who came before me who fought and gave us that right and we are losing sight of that right now. i have never been afraid for our country as i am right now. i am afraid for our country right now, but we have got to hold on to the greatness we have and i will get into ho
this past week. in this highly polarized environment both campaigns have strategically been appealing to their respective political bases. what is unusual about this election cycle is most voters have picked sides early and lead to our polling right after the convention. looks like the final weekend of the campaign. they tell us they are firmly committed to their candidate and the number of undecided voters has been surprisingly very low. single digits. it is not about persuasion. it is about mobilization. both of the conventions were like that. in the next few weeks we will see a lot about mobilizing folks to come out particularly because of early voting which has started in so many states. the middle is shrinking as far as these campaigns are concerned. we will talk about how there is still a middle to america. once you get beyond the campaign labels but clearly those are what drive strategy in campaigns and the electoral politics. if you look at the campaign ads, in new york we are not -- we don't get a lot of ads. i have seen one of you in virginia are seeing and if you are in any
the political environment and the foreign policy concerns that relate to north korea. as a general rule, u.s. north korea policy follows a very similar and repetitive pattern. the provocations by the regime, missile launches, underground nuclear test or the occasional thinking of south korean boat. they are followed by threats of sanction by the international community. a lot of hand wringing. as with the child, the province of better behavior whereupon the international community comes back and provides more aid to the regime. in many respects continuing to prop up the regime. and of course, the aid that is received almost never reaches the people for whom it is delawares end. it is sei phoned off by the military. sold on the black market for hard current sei. this races several questions. i want to plant a few seeds we can come back to. four particular areas i think are worth discussing and thinking about. one is the effect, if any, of sanctions monetary sanctions on a regime like this? well, we all remember what happened about six or seven years ago when the united states froze 25 milli
of serendipitily when the organism in the environment changes. an example of this is feathers. we think feathers evolved to keep their owners warm basically. over time some creatures evolved feathers decided to adopt crazy new lifestyle of flying and ones had new feathers were better at it than ones that didn't have feathers. at one point evolution starts to skult the feathers to make them aerodynamic. so they're still just keeping them warm. flying birds have slightly asymmetrical feathers which gives them better aerodynamics essentially. you can see the shaping of after the change. the idea in accepttationy trait designed for one thing gets designed for something else. in the technology in it history of creative arts, in any field where people try to feel inventive and imaginative, that practice of taking an idea from one place and moving it over and kind of applying it in a new context is incredibly powerful. there's a great story actually not in where good ideas come from that kind of came to me after words, from apple, the most inno site tiff company in the world right now. when apple was t
security for diplomatic missions and create a secure environment for foreign residents and visitors, and the rule of law must extend to everyone throughout the country. the country's leaders also took to the airwaves, newspaper pages and even facebook and twitter to denounce both the attacks and the extremist ideology behind them, putting their own political capital on the line. the foreign minister flew to washington to stand with me and publicly condemn the violence. and so we continue to support those changes that are occurring in libya and tunisia and those leaders and citizens who understand what is expected of them if they are to fulfil their own hope. the situation in the rest of the maghreb is different. morocco and algeria have not experienced revolution, but recent events have tested their values and resolve. last year when citizens of morocco called for change, moroccan society under king muhammed vi answered with major constitutional reform followed by early elections and expanded authority for parliament. and islamist party leads the new ruling coalition, along with a v
of the people are protesting against brought up an authoritarian environment. where nothing was produced unless it was sanctioned by the government, nothing, no film, no book, nothing. in so they look at the world the revolutionary saw that. they concluded that the u.s. was abandoning because we would not allow the stepup protests unless it was a clear signal of we were abandoning. in other words, they toughen their own experience, this doesn't happen the less it is orchestrated by the government. and so that actually entered as the opposition thinking the u.s. is abandoning. barbara administrations, basically protesting. is just a different conceptual paranormal the world. it. >> one more question. >> can you explain that position is this to do with russia and america? what are they trying to point out? >> a good question. many different levels. russia as an arms relationship. lots of business and iran s.w.a.t. the very small thing. was not kept a very well until recently. but it is their only port in the mediterranean another naval vessel, so these are some of the practical aspects. the large
. so i'm not going to revise history to pretend that. i grew up in a religious environment and i am proud of it. i was into the priest. i'm proud of that. i would probably enormously angry right now. so i am grateful for my faith and on and on apologetic about it. >> this is pretty remarkable we started talking a little bit about how it has changed over time. we could have also added to the 19th amendment and women becoming a part of this part of the democratic inclusion. [laughter] but most of the amendments have made it more perfect. they got rid of it. >> ausley understand. >> it is pretty extraordinary. the constitution frees up every american to be eligible for public office, and there is no religious test and that wasn't the prominent feature of the state constitutions. a lot of them actually had religious tests. >> you have the establishment in religion. so, on a understand that but i simply say that the country moved on. i grew up at a time people were respectful of religion and religious people. on grew up when the church was open all the time and nobody broke and and nobod
the economy in an environment, it's difficult to reduce expenses because a lot of expenses of liquids and economic situation that one related to unemployment benefits. in terms of the financial sector, we have to address a problem of pressure, sending, a problem of capacity and a problem of governance and transparency. most of this issue aren't linked with the savings banks. by definition, they were operating with a degree of concentration with real estate, but there's a lot of albums for these things. in terms of funding, there was working with a stronger to touchÉ and with the capacity in the course of 10 minutes a weaker segment of the sector was much more effective to as a problem throughout the system overcapacity. this is at the overcapacity in the spanish financial site are we'll be in the region of 30%. in this problem is going to be address because as a result of the injection of private sector money, the process is going to take in terms of their restructuring of the sector and is going to alter banks that have been the objects of private sector money injection to restructu
and create jobs and helping environments. we do a tremendous amount for education and veterans. we have hired, and if you're a veteran in this room thank you very much for serving this country, we have hired 4800 veterans this year in the last 18 months or so. there is this thing called 100,000 jobs which we help starting hired 28,000 veterans and we have done 4500 ourselves. while other people are talking, we are doing. before this program we will do 1000 so we try to participate and to me it's all the same thing, healthy vibrant company, makes it all possible. the dying company, now been it is possible. i will put it in that same thing by the way, people say as an employee or shareholder if i don't make customers happy there is nothing else. if our employees don't do a good job -- it's all important to me. i try to run a fair profit, take care of your own people in your clients. let me go back to the mistake issue one more time. here's a question for you all. we have something like $15 billion in exposure in derivatives and hedging and bouncing around. you could easily tell me get it down.
? so you come into this environment. many people came in without a job. they're just volunteers and they want to get a job. some people, so they want to get noticed by the right people. and they, you know, and you have people who have been hired who want maybe more responsibility, right, and they probably traditional in their job. you have department heads who are racing against each other to maybe get a little more budget than the other and get a little more turf than the others than you might expect. you have this thing going on where it is a very chaotic time and you really need to get control of this because in this environment where there are no sort of norms, it is like building a village from scratch where everybody comes to a place with no rules, no norms, no structures, right? it's like the wild west and not everybody, you know, some people who, you know, have their own tactics for getting their own way, right? sometimes even good people lose control of their inner jerks. that is a problem early in the campaign, right? we all have them, come on. so you throw an elbow at
become aware because i write about the environment that the stimulus included $90 billion for clean energy leveraging another $100 billion in private capital. it seems like tycos. the united states was spending billion a year on clean energy before the recovery act. in 1999 washington completely knocked president clinton's high in the sky plan to spend $6 billion for clean energy. was dead on arrival. obama got $90 billion in his first months before his staff could find bathrooms in the west wing. just ridiculous. the stimulus was pouring unprecedented rivers of cash and renewables and energy efficiency and every imaginable form, advanced biofuel and electric vehicles and cutting edge research, smarter grid, cleaner coal, factories to make that green stuff in the united states. it was by far the biggest energy bill in history. kind of got me curious what else was in the stimulus everyone was laughing about. i did some investigative reporting with a google search. i learned that the stimulus had also launched race to the top which was a real moment. have you heard of race to the top?
into that environment, excellent issue for campaigns to visualize where they can get benefits by focusing on turnout or registration of their supporters as opposed to merely trying to persuade them. now, this you i don't know if it's 8% are not present that are persuadable. the campaigns will focus on them. but we have a far better science now in understanding what motivates people to vote. and a lot of it -- the science of mobilization turnout has gotten much better. the science of persuasion, it's still pretty vague. and so i do think that there's been a sort of reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques in part because of what we've learned in the last decade. sunday of these two separate things. you certainly know what you give to somebody what you can do to increase their likelihood of voting. and now have better targeting techniques through data to forget who you talk to and about what. and so i don't think of it as necessarily message or targeting, but good campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front and that allows them to understand in a far more precise clean way for their turnou
and all the employees could enjoy a more stable working environment. we could do that to the government, if you will. i think there's a certain amount of risk you are willing to take and you take off the workers and push it on to the equity investors, they will simply dial down the risk-taking to compensate -- you will have a general contraction or slowing of the growth rate of the economy. it's kind of a zero-sum game in that sense. >> host: although i do think most people's perspective in this country is that the risk currently faced by middle-class people who might have their labor redeployed is much greater than the risk actually being felt, faced by high earned income and vested. it's hard to disagree with it. >> guest: i think of making a moral point as opposed to an economic point. unfortunately, i don't think that risk drives up the growth rate of the economy and create jobs. >> host: actually in a way to because to some extent that risk is labor redeployment and you think that risk is sort of beholden on people that might lose their jobs can use it as an economic thousand. >> g
environment. >> the capstone concept forward says the world is trending towards greater stability, yet it says the world is potentially more dangerous than ever. how will the stability overcome the threat? >> well, you know, when people ask me about afghanistan, the first thing i normally tell them is it's possible for violence and progress to coexist in places like afghanistan. i'd say the same thing about the paradox of stability and threat. they coexist. so i've talked about a security paradox which is violence is at an evolutionary low. and it is, except that the capabilities to impart violence are in the hands of people who heretofore wouldn't have had access to them. so you have a paradox of feeling as though the world is -- this is kind of the tom friedman the world is flat and connected and, therefore, is less likely to fight each other. maybe. but there's also the other school of thought that says it's in the unconnected parts of our globe where violence will be both more prevalent, but also more violent because the instruments of violence are more available now than they've ever been
's. wherever i go i have business people. the regulatory environment. they all say it's terrible. it's not just banks. we have done it to ourselves. shoot ourselves in the foot. get rid of that white blanket. and they're is a great -- printed in the wall street journal. kate president-elect ronald reagan some advice. consistent taxes, regulatory. the same positive story over and over and over, and it will turn. and you have to believe in it. so america is usually going to do the right thing after it has exhausted the possibilities. i'm hoping we do. the important part to me is in washington, if you think that washington and business can go to work with each other and begin, collaboration is what should happen. we should have had collaboration we were in a crisis. every business i know wanted to help. would have pulled together, worked around the clock, but it became a war. we are really getting. so it is another wet blanket. the benefit to make it is right and move on. >> list transition. to the extent there has been a marked absence, collaboration, or significant friction between the worlds of
. and an incredible, beautiful environment and also in an interesting election season to say the least. our first award for the evening -- before we get to that, i have to start it was a joke. can i start out with a joke? joe biden. sorry, that's the joke. [applause] followed by another joke, nancy pelosi. sorry. as an ardent practicing catholic. sorry. i was told by friends of "saturday night live" but i do the best nancy pelosi impersonation, but i'm still waiting for that bet they are going to me and "saturday night live." he seemed to avoid goofy liberal spirits on the republicans they do over there. our first award to the evening is the obama got some award. i can't believe i'm actually saying that. troubling. for about 25 years come in the media research center has been documenting every idiocy we know from the media as they celebrate one liberal hero after another. and let me just say, the people we are going to be talking about, they love politicians who want to raise your taxes, right? they love politicians who want to expand the nanny state and are going to check all the boxes here. the
for the next 10 years. >> if you think about economic environment in this country. >> we don't want to let that happen here. >> to make a case you're trying to make him he picked a terrible time to do it. unemployment is 8.3%. how can you make this argument about immigration? >> how can you win in this environment? that's what i mask them. >> it's like how can you make an investment when times are tough? new york city walked away from his future back in the 70s. they did make an investment in infrastructure maintenance or anything because the economy was bad. i missed it decades to work their way out of it. if you go look at history in america when great things were done, the central park on the empire state building, things that start at the bottom of the recession. there is a guy, barnett, not barnett. he asked out by p. larry barnett -- gary barnett. everyone thinks he's crazy. he's been building for the low prices another cinemas demand. he just sold the top two floors and $90 million apiece and he stopped selling them because he can't keep up with the demand. it's got to wait until pr
the funding environment other than giving money? >> no. >> no just giving money, that's it? >> money is one kind of speech, but i was asked a similar question recently, and i said look, barack obama has shown that there is a second model for politicians. you can build a base of small donors, as brad points out it can be very robust. even in the world of unlimited spending. >> any other thoughts on how much impact of citizens have over the state of play? >> one thing, we are in lock up your the five us because we're in a more influential group of citizens. we've influenced even without having to give money. that's one of the things i often point out his money is just one of many forms of influence that affects me. one click and do. when i was at the fec i used to meet a lot, doesn't like to do is ask the groups that coming to washington, and have these big, you can talk to the department of agriculture, a couple hundred kids. i removed one year in the evenings are creating a debate topic and they would have debates. and it's on campaign finance. i look to the resolution that was being introd
and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particularly my colleague, steve coll, who has a recent book published by brookings about feeling betrayed about muslim attitudes which is an excellent book but also the fact the we did the september 27 to october 2nd w
environment, you know, fill in the blank. now, again, this is something that we could debate about at great length, but i assume that if you like federalism defined as some degree of subnational autonomy where people can make decisions rell thetively free -- relatively free of national override, then our constitution does a dreadful job in protecting local autonomy. you might, on the other hand, believe in some areas we have too much local autonomy as a political matter and would want to address that in a constitution. you mentioned cities that are very interesting. texas is six times as large as the entire united states population in 1790. we in austin especially are familiar with the tyranny of a centralized government in austin itself called the state government that often seems determined to deprive the city of austin of autonomy over matters that we hold near and dear. so i think that to the extent that federalism does stand for a principle of decision making at subnational levels and allowing people to participate if decisions that effect their lives, then any modern constitutional co
up and i think it just really does create the environment that we are actually working in as a government today that we still of continued challenges and continue to go to congress for the policies around in the health care profession, education programs and other basis of that. so the government of a little bit different and we recognize that because we have sovereignty had reservations. but we as people are also a little bit different, too and that is because i think they are so tied to our cultural customs and traditions, our language that are clearly based upon how we are as a people. you call yourself a language warrior and spend the whole chapter on language which we know how important this is but why today as a modern-day indian do we care about language? >> guest: great question. to me this is one of my primary passions, but to me language and culture are the important areas to focus on as the native people. it's a big part of what defines us. and of course, you know, a lot of native people didn't grow up speaking their tribal languages through no fault of their
the environment going again, the manufacturing of automobiles and general motors? >> moderator: you mentioned roads and bridges but what would you favor and how would you pay for his? boswell well i think we are going to have to raise the tax. i think we must do that and it will be indexed inflation but we have talked about that before. that is not new information for you. we talked about in the transportation infrastructure committee sometime ago. it was made between mr. young and mr. oberstar who talked to president bush at the time and he said he would veto it so that did not happen. we have got to do it. >> moderator: congressman boswell, believe you support president obama's stand that would raise taxes on people who make over $250,000 a year, is that correct? boswell: that's correct. >> moderator: talking about creating jobs are you worried that will actually slow the economy and hurt job creation? boswell: a lot of people say that when we look at this trickle down theory. i don't see where that has been the historical success when we think of the years we have talked about it but if yo
, and the environment. in the white house, leon panetta was director of the office of management budget and chief of staff, fostering policies that led to a balanced budget in the 1990s making america stronger. at the central intelligence agency, he enabled a spirited response to international terrorism with notable results, disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the nation's 23rd sex tear of defense, leon panetta struck a balance as a force of the advocate for efficiencies also standing resolute in favor of an adequately funded military. bens is pleased to bestow the award recognizing those outstanding americans whose contributions to the country reflect security as the total product of our economic, intellectual, moral, and military strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that receiver in our military. bruce, my greatest thanks to
a lot of friends. and in an incredible, and in a beautiful environment and also in an interesting election season to say the least. our first award for the evening is -- wait, before we get to the. i had to start off wit with a je or can i start off with a joke? joe biden. sorry, that's a joke. followed up by another joke. nancy pelosi. oh, sorry. as an ardent practicing catholic. sorry. i was told by my friends at sun not like that i do the best nancy pelosi impersonation but i'm still waiting for that, you know, that bit they're going to write for me at "saturday night live." they avoid doing the actual bits about goofy liberals. it's all republicans that they do over there. our first award of the evening is the obama gas him a war. i can believe i'm actually saying this. troubling. now this is rich history. for about 25 years they read -- media research center has been document every pc from the media as they celebrate one liberal hero after another. and let me just say that people we're going to be talk about tonight, they love politicians who, want to raise your taxes, right?
life exists in extreme environments and the expedition itself reveals how people might live and work on mars if they were studying. that is of interest to the mission planners. so i followed the scientists in the field to understand how the export. it was a big topic at nasa exploration, but we had never even cognitive science in my home disciplined study exploration in the field as people really explore a new landscape. how did they decide where to go and what tools did they use? i documented how they collected and organized samples that they would analyze the instruments in their laboratories back on earth. i studied how the diagrammed and described their work in their notebooks and how this related to their published work. i observed especially how they tended to work alone or in small groups. but observing the scientists of pasadena, i was taken by the incredible contrast the scientists are indoors in a dark room part of a team doing everything by consensus. people from different disciplines are required to work together. geologists who in the arctic would race to the nearest out
. is that going to be easy because when you have the economy in a recessionary environment it's very difficult to increase revenues and is very difficult to reduce the expenses because a lot of expenses are linked with the macroeconomics situation. in terms of the financial sector we had to address a problem of real-estate -- real funding, the capacity and corporate governance and transparency. most of this issue is linked with the saving banks because by definition this saving banks were operating with real-estate that was where the degree of concentration that creates a lot of problems for these banks. in terms of funding there was also a problem because there was us light problem to work with some of the institutions, the capacity, the cost of funding of this week's segment of the sector, much more effective. it was a problem for the system over capacity. the overcapacity in the spanish financial sector, the region of 30%, and this problem is going to be addressed because as a result of the injection of public sector money, the process is going to take in terms of the restructuring of the s
and a regulatory environment where businesses can flourish. but it doesn't do much more. right now we have a federal government that is far too large, $16 trillion of debt, $1.3 trillion deficit. we need somebody who will stand up and fight. i have that record in the house. that's the record i will take to the senate. that's what i would appreciate your vote, and thank you. >> our next closing statement is from marc victor. >> ladies and gentlemen, our country was founded upon freedom. we are about individual rights and responsibilities. we are about free markets. we are about being free to both defined and pursue your own happiness. it's about americans being in charge of themselves. these are the principles that made us a great nation, but we have strayed so far from these principles. we have a busybody government that is into everything. it regulates, taxes everything and everyone literally to death. it's involved in our lives cradle-to-grave. over 16 trillion in debt now and going ever higher. highest incarceration rate in the world. over 2 million in prison. perpetual wars that we kee
environment other than giving money? >> that's how. >> has just giving money. >> that's it. >> money is one kind of speech. i was asked a similar question at a gathering recently and i said look, barack obama has shown there's a second model for politicians. you can build a base of small donors and as brad points out it can be a robust, even unlimited spending. >> any other thoughts on how much impact citizens have over the state of play? >> we are and what appear the five of us because we are in the more influential group of citizens. we have influence without having to give money. that's one of the things i point out, it went quick anecdote. when i was at the fec, used to coming to washington to spend a week or two in the summer, and the attacks of the department of agriculture. and i remember one year they were creating a debate topic and they would have these debates on campaign finance. i looked at the resolution being introduced to regulate campaign finance. the students thought that the regulation, their proposal would create more regulation than the current system had. but actually
missions and create a secure environment for foreign residents and visitors, and the rule of law must extend to everyone throughout the country. the country's leaders also took the airwaves to newspaper pages even facebook and twitter to denounce both the attacks and the extremist ideology behind them, putting their own political capital on the line. the foreign minister flew to washington stand with me and publicly condemn the violence. and so we continue to support those changes that are occurring in libya and in tunisia and those leaders and citizens who understand what is expected of them if they are to fulfill their own hopes. now the situation and the rest of the maghreb is different. morocco and algeria have not experienced revolutions, but recent events have also tested their values and resolve. last year when citizens of morocco called for change, moroccan society under king mohammed the sixth answered with major constitutional reforms followed by early elections and expanded authorities for parliament. an islamist party leads the new ruling coalition along with a 480 of othe
and a cleaner environment but an energy policy that creates 5 million new jobs. a foreign policy that ends this war in iraq. a foreign policy that goes after the one mission the american public gave the president after 9/11, to get and capture or kill bin laden. and to eliminate al qaeda. a policy that would, in fact, engage our allies in making sure that we knew we were acting on the same page and not dictating. and a policy that would reject the bush doctrine of preemption and regime change and replace it with the doctrine of prevention and cooperation, and ladies and gentlemen, this is the biggest ticket item we have in this election, the most important election you will ever, ever have voted in since 1932. and we are such stark differences. i would follow through on barack's policies to get in essence i agree with everything, every major initiative he has suggested. >> moderator: governor. palin: and heaven forbid yes, that that would ever happen. no matter how this ends up, that that would ever happen with either party. as for disagreeing with john mccain and how our administration wo
say make us safer and stronger in this new threatened environment is very curious. i think it does have something to do with them as i started, with a vision that the governor has. if your vision of what's happening in the world is driven by russia's strategic threat and you want to confront china on day one and you want to confront the states, and you want to be hunkered down in the middle east while these transnational threats and substate actors are hitting is very hard, then that's a totally different approach, i agree. if you want to be where the president has been, which is very aggressive against al qaeda, supporting the democratic and moderate forces, during the transitions in afghanistan and iraq, frankly to lighten our burden in the middle east, so we could move into confront other threats of the world. it is a faster, more agile, it is a smarter, tougher and stronger approach. one has to look at the previous administrations. if that's what people want in their security process going forward, they can have it again because it sounds exactly like what it does, is suggestin
, abortion rights, environment, everyth ing is on about it. they can also get it on mine. do not worry. there is a gender gap. since 1980 and it is the voice. we got the elements of but they say they do not to go to the same numbers. no. that was wrong then and it is very wrong now. reproduction rights, family planning, i could go on. when you hear it has disappeared, it is coming back. the difference between men and women's votes it will be there it is fair look at the combination of khamenei republicans it it is based on the polls. . .acacacacacacaaac
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